The Jerusalem Council

A Global Association of Orthodox Jewish Believers in Messiah Yeshua

Jewish Holidays 2009 (Moedim 5769-5770)

A list of Jewish holidays for Gregorian year 2009 for the moedim (appointed times) 5769-5770, and dates to request off from work from your employer for those in the diaspora (assuming a 9-5 work shift).

Purim 2009 – Purim 5769

  • Fast Begins:  Fast begins after sundown on March 8.
  • Fast Ends: When three stars are seen after sundown March 9.
  • Purim Begins: After sundown on March 9.
  • Purim Ends: After sundown on March 10.
  • Shushan Purim Begins: After sundown on March 10.
  • Shushan Purim Ends: After sundown on March 11.
  • Dates to Request off from work: none.

Passover 2009 – Pesach 5769

  • Begins: 18 minutes before sundown on April 8
  • Ends:  After sundown on April 16.
  • Dates to Request off from work for those in Israel: April 9, 15.
  • Dates to Request off from work for those in the Diaspora: April 9, 10, 15, 16.

Feast of Weeks 2009 – Shavuot 5769

  • Begins: 18 minutes before sundown on May 28.
  • Ends: After sundown on May 29.
  • Date to Request off from work for those in Israel and the Diaspora: May 29.

Feast of Trumpets 2009 – Yom Teruah 5770

  • Begins: 18 minutes before sundown September 18.
  • Ends: After sundown on September 20.
  • Dates to Request off from work for those in Israel and the Diaspora: September 19, 20.

Day of Atonement 2009 – Yom Kippur 5770

  • Begins: 18 minutes before sundown on September 27.
  • Ends: After sundown on September 28.
  • Date to Request off from work for those in Israel and the Diaspora: September 28.

Feast of Tabernacles 2009 – Sukkot 5770

  • Begins: 18 minutes before sundown on October 2.
  • Ends: After sundown on October 9.
  • Dates to Request off from work for those in Israel and the Diaspora:  October 3, 9.

The Eigth Day of Assembly – Shimonei Atzeret

  • Begins: 18 minutes before sundown on October 9.
  • Ends: After sundown on October 10.
  • Date to Request off from work for those in Israel: October 10.
  • Dates to Request off from work for those in the Diaspora: October 10, 11.

We will update this list soon with the other minor holidays.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

3 Responses to “Jewish Holidays 2009 (Moedim 5769-5770)”

  • Polycarp says:

    I have been wrestling with my continued celebration of ‘Easter.’ I know that a large portion of the early Church kept Nissan 14 as the celebration of Passover – the Quarterodecimans. Any thoughts?

    • When one studies the pagan origins of accepted Christian holidays, they will find that Christians do everything in accordance with the pagan rituals, except the incantations themselves. I don’t want to post examples on it here, since it’s so disgusting. Some books such as “Ancient Ways: Reclaiming Pagan Traditions” will make any Christian investing the matter, if they don’t puke first, to cease absolutely immediately from engaging in any further traditional Christian holidays. G-d’s holidays, and G-d’s ways are truly the only good holidays. Just as our spouses would not want us to celebrate their birthday on that of a former girlfriend’s, so too HaShem does not want to be worshiped in the ways (and days) of the nations and their gods. The Jerusalem Council of the 1st Century certainly included this as their top requirement for those coming to Messiah from the nations and paganism: to “abstain from idolatry.” Idolatry is more than just the worship of foreign gods, but it is also engaging in their worship practices in the worship of G-d himself. It should be no surprise that believers in the 1st Century until the Romanization of the sect, were found keeping Sabbath, Passover, and the rest of the holidays of HaShem as commanded in his Torah. That Christians typically hang on to the traditional Christian holidays today is nothing more than keeping the traditions of men at the expense of keeping G-d’s commandments, and G-d’s ways.

      When we attempt to “do religion” without first consulting G-d’s instructions, we end up with golden calves. The Torah tells the story of the golden calf in juxtaposition to the instructions for the building of the Tabernacle. The Tabernacle represents G-d’s way of doing spirituality. The golden calf represents man’s way of doing spirituality. G-d and Israel were both striving for the same end: they were each attempting to create a medium whereby Israel could worship G-d and celebrate their relationship with Him. Their methods of accomplishing that end were very different, though.

  • Polycarp says:

    This, we can agree on, for the most part. I detest using lies to celebrate the Truth.